MATH 152: Calculus II

Syllabus Sheet

Class Hours:  MWF  8:45am—9:50am     SB 204

Professor:  Jeffrey Duan

Home Page: www.iit.edu/~duan

Office Hours: MW  11:15am-12:05pm or by appointment

Office: 115B  E1

Telephone Number: 312-567-5335

Email: duan@iit.edu

 

Textbook

Calculus (5th Edition) by James Stewart

 

Prerequisites

Math 151 or Math 149(Calculus I); or Advanced Placement

 

Topics

  1. Chapter 7: Transcendental Functions
  2. Chapter 8: Techniques of Integration
  3. Chapter 10: Differential Equations
  4. Chapter 11: Parametric Equations & Polar Coordinates
  5. Chapter 12: Infinite Series
  6. Appendix G: Complex Numbers

Homework/Quizzes

Homework will be assigned after each lecture and due on the following Wednesday in class. Late homework will not be graded, but the worst two scores will be dropped.  Please put your name, your section number, the homework set number, and the date on your homework paper.  Quizzes will be given occasionally and will be announced during the lecture. No make-ups for quizzes but the worst score will be dropped. 

 

Exams

Two mid-term exams and one accumulative final exam. Attending classes is essential to help you do well on the exams. Some application examples, which are not in the textbook, will be given during lectures and will be tested. The two mid-terms will take place during the regular class period.   No make-up exams will be given for unexcused absences.  The final exam will serve as the make-up exam for an excused and documented absence.

 

Grading policy

Discussion of the homework problems is encouraged, but cooperation/copying solutions is prohibited. Duplicate solutions will be considered evidence of academic dishonesty.  The University policy on  academic dishonesty will be strictly enforced (see Student Handbook). All homework, quizzes and exams will be graded for mathematical correctness and written presentation. Points will be deducted for sloppiness, incoherent or insufficient explanation, or for lack of supporting rationale. The solutions should be presented clear enough so that your fellow students would be able to understand both the calculations and logic.