Static Electricity:

Catherine Walker John Hope Academy
5515 South Lowe
Chicago IL 60621
(312) 535 3160

State Goals 3 and 4:

As a result of their schooling, students will have a working knowledge of:
the principles of scientific research and their application in simple
research projects, the processes, techniques, methods, equipment and avail-
able technology of science.

Outcomes:

Students will be able to analyze, evaluate or replicate the experimental work
of others.
Students will be able to observe, classify and predict.
Students will be able to make inferences about phenomena observed.
Students will be able to collect data, define concepts and verify results.

Objective:

Grade 8
Students will identify conditions and objects which will create static
electricity as opposed to current electricity.

Materials Needed:

Plastic combs
Wool and nylon material
Tiny bits of paper
Cup full of puffed rice
Cigarette ashes
Aluminum foil
Glass poles
Plastic rulers
Plastic trays

Strategies:

Introduce lesson with a discussion on types of electricity.
Students receive assigned materials.
Cut paper into tiny pieces.
Cut aluminum foil into tiny pieces.
Fill cup with puffed rice.
Place cigarette ashes on tray.

Take plastic comb, rub vigorously with wool, move close to paper..
Observe and record results.
Repeat previous step using puffed rice, aluminum foil and cigarette ashes.
Observe and record results.

Take glass pole, rub vigorously with wool, move close to paper, foil and
finally cigarette ashes.
Observe and record results.

Take plastic ruler, rub vigorously with wool, move close to paper, foil and
finally cigarette ashes.
Observe and record results

Repeat all of the steps above rubbing instruments vigorously with nylon
material.
Observe and record results.

Performance Assessment:

Given ten objects, students will choose at least seven with static
electricity.

Conclusions:

Electricity as we now know it is of two basic kinds: static/current electricity.
Static electricity name comes from the Greek word meaning "standing", because
it is normally at rest. It passes from one body to another only in sudden,
momentary movements. Experiments with static electricity works best when the
weather is cool and dry.

It was discovered that the instruments rubbed with wool attracted materials
more readily than with nylon.

Return to Physics Index