Claudette Soto

Claudette Soto is currently a Project Executive at d’Escoto, Inc., which is one of the largest Hispanic owned Construction Management firms in Chicago. She is currently heading the architectural division for d’Escoto, Inc. which entails overseeing design staff, management of design projects, and business development. She has been working in the construction management, architectural, and engineering field for 13 years. Ms. Soto received a Bachelor of Architecture and a Professional Master Degree in Structural Engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology. In 2001, as an undergraduate, Ms. Soto founded a local non-for-profit organization named VAMOS. VAMOS tries to promote the importance of higher education to middle school children in the community of Gage Park through summer enrichment programs and one on one mentoring. VAMOS has now evolved into a mentoring program from middle school age through college age students who are seeking higher education or are currently engaged in a college/university program. Ms. Soto currently sits on the Board of Trustees, Educational Committee, and Buildings and Grounds Committee at Mother McAuley High School, is on the selection committee for the Fernando Chapa Scholarship Fund at the Illinois Institute of Technology, advisor to the Illinois Institute of Technology Arquitectos Chapter, Board Member of the Rauner Family YMCA, Advisor to Girls 4 Science and is an Associate Member of the American Institute of Architects. Ms. Soto is also a graduate from the Metropolitan Leadership Institute (MLI). MLI is a year-long training program which incorporates UNO’s 20+ years of community organizing experience towards the development of Hispanic leaders within metropolitan Chicago. She is the proud recipient of a HACIA scholarship and the Joseph Claussen Award for Community Service. Ms. Soto attributes her strong will for success, outspoken demeanor and thirst for change in her community, to the education she received while attending Mother McAuley High School, a single gender high school in Chicago. There she received the confidence to pursue degrees not traditionally pursued by women and to know her voice mattered.

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